A NEW AFRICA

Will Lead the World to the Future

By EA Armament & Surveillance Technologies Ltd.

 

  • Africa has all the natural and human resources required to lead the world economically, politically, and militarily. What it does not have is control of its economies, the loyalty of its civil servants, and a military capable of protecting boundaries.

 

  • African politics, economies, and militaries have been historically sabotaged, contained and controlled by European colonial empires and America’s New World Order. Both hindrances were founded on philosophies of White Supremacy over other races.

 

  • For Africa to have a self-sustaining economy, it would need control of its ports, among other things.

 

  • For Africa to have governments loyal to its people, it would need a law enforcement, peacekeeping, security and defense apparatus dedicated to the rule of law, independent of the local governments and foreign influence.

 

  • New technologies can assist African states to surpass previously developed countries in establishing advanced logistics, communication and security infrastructure.

#Africa #NewAfrica #AfricaLeads

Summary

Since the pre-colonial age, Europe and America have evangelized definitions of religion, democracy, capitalism, free-trade, and globalism that were designed to keep them in control of global resources. The quintessential version of this strategy was “the New World Order”, declared by the United States in 1989-90, which was established and maintained through such eminent institutions like the World Bank, the United Nations, the EU, the International Criminal Court, and the World Trade Organization, among others. Under these regimes, Africa floundered and was kept in a fragile state of peacekeeping, to ensure that local divisions that allow for foreign control are maintained.

A New Africa, led by the latest generation of youth bred in modern African cities, is trying to emerge from that prolonged era of unkept promises. They are riding the wave of rapid technological advancement that has placed African states in a position to leapfrog over traditional limitations and competition. Now, Africa, as a continent, or as one united nation, can lead the world into the next era of technology and prosperity.

The only hindrance to a New Africa leading the world would be the demoralizing legacy and overburdening luggage of Old Africa.

Old Africa

Pre-colonial African societies were of a highly varied nature, characterized by a large degree of pluralism and flexibility. One reason for this was that the villages commonly owned the land, which impeded the establishment of a domineering aristocracy. Secondly, as there was always an abundance of available land to which dissatisfied individuals or groups could defect, communities were mindful not to alienate productive citizens. The continent therefore consisted of a wide network of fluid units, ready to accept newcomers who abide by local customs, blanketed by a sense of obligation and solidarity that went beyond the nuclear family.[1] These were perfect examples of federal societies or federations.

Most African villages were founded on the principles that they were self-governing. The chiefs ran the daily affairs together with one or more councils, yet all members took part, directly or indirectly, in the general management of the tribe. The role of the chief during such meetings was, to sum up what had been said, and attempt to form some consensus among the diverse opinions. If unanimity was not reached, a village assembly would be called to debate the issue. The chief would listen silently to all queries during such meetings, any male adult was free to criticize him, and majority ruling would apply. Hence the chief did not rule or dictate but led by consensus. These were perfect examples of democratic societies or democracies.

In most tribes, the villagers could depose a chief that was thought to have abused his power. These were perfect examples of the rule of law; the laws applied to everyone equally.

Building such a consensus and applying the law fairly across a large region made the political and legal processes invariably slow, as well as prone to authoritarianism that could effectively silence dissent. Therefore, the claims that Africa’s pre-colonial peasant cultures had “oppressive reactionary tendencies” that were “only slightly less grave than the racist colonial culture”[2] are not only logical, but also mirror the same resistance to public criticism we hear from the most modern of Western democratic governments today.

In many parts of Africa, especially in the British colonies where indirect rule was the norm, these indigenous systems of government survived and were used alongside the colonial system. One reason why the structures of such political institutions still exist in Africa today, is due to the colonial powers having employed chiefs as remote colonial administrators, buffers between themselves and the masses. Colonial rule thereby reduced most traditional African leaders, who were previously esteemed representatives of their clans, to salaried officials, responsible to white supervisors, corrupted by the promise of permanent aristocracy, power and wealth; completely beholden to and under the control of a white-supremacist foreign government.

As chieftaincy became something one could obtain through a foreign government, a new level of political science emerged for Africans. Ambitious young men no longer needed to grow old and wise, or earn the respect of the village by proving his loyalty and dedication to serving them. Instead, one could easily enough become a chief by simply promising the white-supremacists more than his predecessor did. With each new coup, therefore, came bigger and bigger promises that t sank the nations further and further into the debt of the colonialists. Our leaders have been selling our future to white-supremacists in exchange for aristocracy, power and wealth today. Such elevations of unmerited individuals to high positions of authority further exacerbated the ethnic tensions that were already stirred up by the colonial “divide-and-conquer” strategy, and it kept the colonialist in a position where they could fight one side against the other at their convenience.

This was the birth of modern-day African politics; and nothing has changed since then. Today, African politicians are still selling their children’s future to white-supremacists in exchange for aristocracy, power and wealth today.

New Africa

A New Africa, led by the latest generation of youth bred in modern African cities, is trying to emerge from that prolonged era of unkept promises. They are riding the wave of rapid technological advancement that has placed African states in a position to leapfrog over traditional limitations and competition. Now, Africa, as a continent, or as one united nation, can lead the world into the next era of technology and prosperity.

The only hindrance to a New Africa leading the world would be the demoralizing legacy and overburdening luggage of Old Africa.

[1] https://stiffkitten.wordpress.com/2010/08/13/pre-colonial-africa/; Sam Mbah et al, “African anarchism – the history of a movement”, See Sharp Press 1997, chapter 3; Charles Feinstein, “An economic history of South Africa”, Cambridge University Press, 2005, page 18; Preben Kaarsholm et al, “Inventions and boundaries: historical and anthropological approaches to the study of ethnicity and nationalism”, IDS, Roskilde University, 1994; Leonard Thomson, “A history of South Africa”, Yale University Press, 1990, page 11-29 and 76-78; George Ayittey, “Africa Betrayed”, MacMillan, 1992, page 12, 38-46, 325; Nelson Mandela, “Long walk to freedom”, Abacus, 1997, page 4, 24-25; James Cypher et al, “The process of economic development”, Routledge 1995, page 195-196

[2] Ngugi wa Thiongo’o, “Detained”, Heinemann, 1981, page 106;

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